How to say I love you in Chinese

Posted by Iris Liu on Mar 18, 2016

how to say i love you in Chinese Chinese Valentine's Day is on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month in the Chinese calendar. Historically, it has another name - is The Daughter's Festival - which is the day for unmarried young girls looking for love.

So if you meet a Chinese girlfriend or boyfriend, how best to express your love? The most common way to say "I love you" in Chinese is "我(wǒ)爱(ài)你(nǐ)," but it is very direct expression. If you say the three words directly, it will scare many Chinese girls away. Today, I will give you some different ways to express your love in a more nuanced fashion.

Sentence 1: Say "我(wǒ)爱(ài)你(nǐ)" in Mandarin

This is the most common, standard way of telling someone "I love you" in Chinese.

In traditional Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我愛你;

In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我爱你。

If you are interested in Chinese character "love", you can see this article love in Chinese writing and know more details of "爱". This expression is roughly pronounced, wuh-eye-knee". The "wo"should be pronounced in the 3rd tone (slightly dipping and then rising to a higher pitch). The "ai"is a fourth tone (sharp, falling pitch) and the"ni" is again a 3rd tone.

Sentence 2: Say "我(wǒ)爱(ài)上(shàng)你(nǐ)了(le)" in Mandarin.

This phrase means, "I've fallen in love with you."

In traditional Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我愛上你了;

In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我爱上你了。

This expression is roughly pronounced, whoa eye shang knee le. The "wo" is a third tone. The "ai" is a fourth tone. The "shang" (with a long a sound) is also a fourth tone. The "ni" is a third tone and le is a neutral tone.

Sentence 3: Say "我(wǒ)很(hěn)喜(xǐ)欢(huan)你(nǐ)" or "我(wǒ)非(fēi)常(cháng)喜(xǐ)欢(huan)你(nǐ)" in Mandarin

This phrase roughly means, "I like you lots" or "I really like you." "很" or "非常" both express very, really.

The expression of traditional Chinese characters and simplified Chinese characters are the same.

This expression is roughly pronounced, whoa hun she-huan knee. The "wo" becomes a second tone (rising tone) because it is followed by the third tone "hen". Or "fei" is the first tone, "chang" is the second tone. The third tone "xi" should rise to a high pitch that is maintained in the first tone huan. Ni is a third tone.

Sentence 4: Say "我(wǒ)的(de)心(xīn)里(li)只(zhǐ)有(yǒu)你(nǐ)" in Mandarin.

This phrase essentially means, "You are the only one in my heart."

In traditional Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我的心裏只有你;

In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我的心里只有你。

This expression is roughly pronounced, "whoa de sheen lee, jir yo knee". The "wo" is third, "de" is neutral, "xin" is a first tone and should be chunked together with the third tone "li". The "zhi" is tricky; the "zh" is pronounced like a j. Imagine after the i is an r that kind of tags along, there but only barely. This is a second tone because "you" is a third tone. The "ni" is a third tone. There is a very popular song in China, its name is我(wǒ)的(de)心(xīn)里(li)只(zhǐ)有(yǒu)你(nǐ)没(méi)有(yǒu)他(tā).

Sentence 5: Say "你(nǐ)偷(tōu)走(zǒu)了(le)我(wǒ)的(de)心(xīn)"in Mandarin.

The English equivalent of this phrase would be, "You have stolen my heart."

This expression is roughly pronounced, knee tow dzou le whoa de sheen". The "Ni" is third. The "tou" is first, which is grouped with the third tone "zou" and the neutral le.The "wo" is third tone, de is neutral and "xin" is first.

Sentence 6: Say "你(nǐ)是(shì)第(dì)一(yī)个(gè)让(ràng)我(wǒ)如(rú)此(cǐ)心(xīn)动(dòng)的(de)人(rén)" in Mandarin.

This sentence is used to say, "You are the first person who thrill my heart."

This expression is roughly pronounced, "knee shir dee yee guh rang whoa ru tsi sheen dong duh ren." Shi is similar to zhi but the sh is just like in English. Di is a fourth tone. Yi is a first tone (make sure to draw it out). Rang is another long a word, fourth tone. Wo stays as a third tone. Ru is a second (rising tone). Ci is another tricky sound. The c is pronounced like the combination of a t and an s. Ci is a third tone. Xin is first and dong (with a long o) is fourth. De is neutral and ren is second. If you can try to make your r sound like a French j and an r mixed together. This is more standard pronunciation.

Sentence 7: Say "衣(yī)带(dài)渐(jiàn)宽(kuān)终(zhōng)不(bù)悔(huǐ),为(wéi)伊(yī)消(xiāo)得(dé)人(rén)憔(qiáo)悴(cuì)" in Mandarin.

This verse means that the dress takes to loosen gradually and I am more and more emaciated, No regretful plying at all, I am rather for her only distressed as I did. This comes from Die Lian Hua written by Liu yong, who is poet in song dynasty. Chinese poetry can express more feelings of love, Chinese girl will feel very romantic.

Sentence 8: Say "执(zhí)子(zǐ)之(zhī)手(shǒu),与(yǔ)子(zǐ)偕(xié)老(lǎo)" in Mandarin.

This verse means that Ttaking your hand, living to old age together, which comes from Ji Gu written by anonym, who is poet in Former Qin. This is a very popular poem and often used in Chinese wedding.

Below the short video will help you understand how to say I love you in Chinese better.

About The Author

Iris Liu

Iris Liu is a Chinese Learning teacher at Hanbridge Mandarin. Iris holds a MTCSOL degree from Jilin University. Iris has the skills and drive to make learning Chinese both fun and fruitful for her students.

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